book review: breakout

Breakout was my first (non-graphic) novel I’ve read starring the badass criminal Parker. I’ve read some Parker stories in Darwyn Cooke’s great graphic adaptations, but never one of the Richard Stark (Donald Westlake) originals. This is what I imagine the James Patterson machines/Lee Childs of the world are wishing they were writing.

Parker is a badass (I may have mentioned this already). The book opens with a heist going bad and Parker being arrested. He immediately starts making a plan to break out of jail, but he needs a crew. So he makes one, but to get one of the people he needs he has to agree to a job later, which leads to… well a plot that just keeps on ticking over. Even if things don’t feel uber-realistic they feel very appropriate for  the story. The sentences are simple and the action is clear, never super subtle, but it’s just somehow so much better than an Alex Cross story.

If you like crime stories, you should really give one of these a try (and the Darwyn Cooke comic adaptations are also great).

book review: the mirror thief

I found Martin Seay’s The Mirror Thief in the course of helping a library user learn how to download ebooks. I grabbed it as a random example from our Mystery & Thriller category and the blurb intrigued me. It’s a three-timeline story about 1) a vet home from Afghanistan trying to find an old gambler friend of his father’s in 2003 Las Vegas, 2) a homeless teenage grifter looking for the poet who wrote a book he’s desperately trying to understand in 1950s California and 3) an alchemist in 1500s Italy arranging the theft of mirror-making artisans for the Hakemi Sultan in Constantinople.

The three settings (the Venetian, Venice Beach and Venice) felt distinct in style of story and language, but connect reasonably satisfactorily. It wasn’t mind blowing but it was entertaining.

book review: sam & fuzzy fix your problem

I’ve been reading Sam Logan’s comic Sam and Fuzzy for years on the web, but this past weekend I bought the two print volumes at Emerald City Comicon in Seattle. Sam & Fuzzy Fix Your Problem doesn’t start at the beginning of the epic, but at the point where Sam and his talking bear friend Fuzzy are the heads of Ninja Mafia Services, an organization that helps with odd problems like Grrbils, Werewolves and Vampires. This book also switches back an forth to ten years previous when Fuzzy woke up without a memory and ended up working with a master thief named Hazel.

I enjoyed this book version of the comics I had already read. Sam & Fuzzy has always been a comic I let lapse when I go off travelling so I can binge read a bunch when I return and I think it works better that way. Logan has done an excellent job laying out the book and making the story feel like a story and not stitched together daily strips. I’m astounded how much more interesting the flashbacks to Fuzzy and Hazel are when I’m not waiting three days between chunks.

So yes, Sam and Fuzzy is pretty great, and Sam & Fuzzy Fix Your Problem is an excellent place to get on board. You can also go back through the archives on the website to fill in the backstory of how Sam became emperor of the Ninja Mafia (and more).