story-gaming in libraries full bibliography

For my class on Services for Young Adults I wrote a Topic Briefing on Story-Focused Games in libraries. I ended up not using everything I’d read, because it’s only a five page paper. Here’s the full bibliography. There are a bunch of videogame related articles I skimmed in the course of research, but they don’t show up here. Also, some of the books of essays had other essays I read, but didn’t come close to using so they aren’t in here (but the book as a whole might be). My favourite resources in the bibliography are bolded.

  • Cover, J. G. (2010). The Creation of Narrative in Tabletop Role-Playing Games. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company.
  • Falk, J., & Davenport, G. (2004). Live role-playing games: Implications for pervasive gaming. International Federation for Information Processing, 127–138.
  • Farmer, L. S. J. (2011). How school libraries can provide gender equity in e-gaming. Knowledge Quest, 40(1), 16–17.
  • Fernández Vara, C. (2009). The tribulations of adventure games : integrating story into simulation through performance. Georgia Institute of Technology.
  • Fine, G. A. (1983). Shared fantasy: role-playing games as social worlds. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=Kx6UQgAACAAJ
  • Gallaway, B. (2009). Game on!: gaming at the library. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=0d7QAQAACAAJ
  • Grabianowski, E. (2012). why is the 5th edition of dungeons & dragons a big deal? io9.com. Retrieved from http://io9.com/5874922/why-is-the-5th-edition-of-dungeons–dragons-a-big-deal
  • Gray, J., Sandvoss, C., & Harrington, C. L. (2007). Introduction: Why Study Fans? In J. Gray, C. Sandvoss, & C. L. Harrington (Eds.), Fandom: Identities and Communities in a Mediated World (pp. 1–16). New York: New York University Press.
  • Harris, C., & Kirk, T. (2011). It’s All Fun and Games in the Library. Knowledge Quest, 40(1), 8–9.
  • Harris, M. (2012). Future of reading? “Active fiction” lets readers make the call. Canada.com. Retrieved from http://www.canada.com/news/Future+reading+Active+fiction+lets+readers+make+call/6038524/story.html
  • Hoenke, J. (2011). Game On! Envisioning Your Own Video Game. Justin The Librarian. Retrieved from http://justinthelibrarian.wordpress.com/category/libraries/game-on-envisioning-your-own-video-game/
  • Joseph, B. (2008). Why Johnny Can’t Fly: Treating Games as a Form of Youth Media Within a Youth Development Framework. In K. Salen (Ed.), The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning (pp. 253–265). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Mackay, D. (2001). The fantasy role-playing game: a new performing art. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=s8YRVbDknyUC
  • McGonigal, J. (2008). Why I Love Bees: A Case Study in Collective Intelligence Gaming. In K. Salen (Ed.), The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning (pp. 199–227). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Nicholson, S. (2007). Go Back to Start: Gathering Baseline Data about Gaming in Libraries. Because Play Matters. Retrieved from http://librarygamelab.org/backtostart.pdf
  • Nicholson, S. (2008a). Finish your games so you can start your schoolwork: A look at gaming in school libraries. Library Media Connection, 26(5), 52–55.
  • Nicholson, S. (2008b). Modern board games: It’s not a Monopoly any more. Library Technology Reports, 44(3), 8–10, 38–39.
  • Nicholson, S. (2008c). Reframing Gaming – Clearing up misconceptions about this increasingly popular activity. American Libraries, (7), 50–51.
  • Nicholson, S. (2009). Library gaming census report. American Libraries, 40(1/2), 44.
  • Nicholson, S. (2012). Crossed Paths: An Improvisational Storytelling Game. Because Play Matters. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/crossedpaths
  • Salen, K. (Ed.). (2008). The ecology of games: connecting youth, games, and learning. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation series on digital media and learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=OSPQ196R3kMC
  • Sullivan, A., Mateas, M., & Wardrip-Fruin, N. (2010). Rules of engagement: moving beyond combat-based quests. Proceedings of the Intelligent Narrative Technologies III Workshop (p. 11). ACM. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1822320
  • Wallis, J. (2007). Making Games That Make Stories. In P. Harrigan & N. Wardrip-Fruin (Eds.), Second Person: Role-Playing and Story in Games and Playable Media (pp. 69–80). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Wardrip-Fruin, N., & Harrigan, P. (Eds.). (2007). Second person: role-playing and story in games and playable media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=P20NAQAAMAAJ
  • Wark, M. K. (2007). Gamer theory. Gamer Theory. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=peytfo3E-IIC
  • White, M. M. (2008). Level 10 Human Student: The Effects of Non-Curricular Role-Playing Game Use on Academic Achievement and Self-Efficacy. Memorial University of Newfoundland. Retrieved from http://gradworks.umi.com/MR/69/MR69308.html
  • Williams, J P, Hendricks, S. Q., & Winkler, W. K. (Eds.). (2006). Gaming as culture: essays on reality, identity and experience in fantasy games. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=i7UBWz6LBK4C
  • Williams, J Patrick, Hendricks, S. Q., & Winkler, W. K. (2006). Introduction: Fantasy Games, Gaming Cultures, and Social Life. In J P Williams, S. Q. Hendricks, & W. K. Winkler (Eds.), Gaming As Culture: Essays on Reality, Identity and Experience in Fantasy Games (pp. 1–18). Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=i7UBWz6LBK4C
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